Friday 5: Count All the Bees in the Hive

Which of the Winnie-the-Pooh characters do you most relate to?

Rabbit, I suppose? I like to read, I can be bossy, and I find real-life Tiggers to be very trying.

 

The original Winnie the Pooh toys

Which of the Winnie-the-Pooh characters has qualities you’d find most attractive in a romantic partner?

My own partner is very much a Piglet, if that’s any indication!

 

In what way have you “wandered much further” today than you should?

I’m only answering this in the morning, so the day has hardly begun, really. I’ll admit to sleeping in a little, but only a little.
Of Winnie-the-Pooh stories you can remember (from the books, Disney cartoons, or other sources), which is your favorite?

To be honest, I don’t remember much from Winnie-the-Pooh. I know I liked the Disney adaptation of “Winnie-the-Pooh and the Blustery Day” when I was younger. I was also quite enamored with the word “blustery” and immediately set about using it in real life.

I also like the Russian animated adaptations. The art is so charming! The crayon backgrounds look just like a child’s drawing, which I think is very appropriate for Winnie-the-Pooh. Plus, this version of Piglet is absolutely adorable.

There are only three, but they’re all freely available on YouTube. Here is the first Винни Пух adaptation: В которой мы знакомимся с Винни-Пухом и несколькими подозрительными пчелами. (In which we meet Winnie the Pooh and a few suspicious bees.)

 

Which quote from the Winnie-the-Pooh stories would be good for the epigraph in the book about your life?

“I’ve got a sort of idea, but I don’t suppose it’s a very good one.”

Friday 5 on Sunday: Something’s Astir

What did you last use a spatula for?

Nothing.

One of my Swedish friends here was an exchange student in the US when he was younger, and somehow the question of kitchen implements came up often. It turned out that his host family didn’t really know what to call anything, either, so any unknown kitchen implement was just immediately labeled “spatula.”
What did you last use your can opener for?

We don’t even have a can opener!
What did you last pick up with a pair of tongs?

I don’t think we even have tongs? So probably a baked good at the store or Pressbyran.

A clay jar with a metal ladle and wooden kitchen implements in an out-of-focus kitchen.
What did you last use a ladle for?

Chili, I think.
What did you last stir with a wooden spoon?

Some boiling pasta, to get it to settle down a little.

Friday 5: Rest

When did you last need a few days of complete rest and nothing else?

I feel like that every day, to be honest. I had a really gnarly chest cold for most of February that kept me relatively housebound. I’m better now, but the first two weeks were unpleasant, to say the least.

 

How do you keep yourself occupied when you have to be in bed all day and night?

Music; reading; reviewing vocabulary on Anki, Memrise, DuoLingo, and Clozemaster; sleeping.

 

Who do you most want to hear from when you have to withdraw to your bed for a few days of rest?

It depends. Whenever I have to go into self-imposed quarantine, it means I have a lot of time to just think; often, I’ll remember a story or a question I had for someone in particular. But usually I can just send them a message on Gchat or Facebook, so I don’t have to make immediate plans to see them when I’m feeling better.

 

What adverse effects have you experienced while staying in bed for a few days?

I don’t like the deconditioning and loss of stamina/energy I notice when I feel better enough to go running again.

 

When you first notice a few symptoms, are you more likely to shut everything down right away, or try to power through until you don’t have a choice anymore?

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” I try to take it as easy as possible right from the beginning, including lots of garlic, zinc, and lemon tea.

Friday Five: Hold On to the Knight

A blogging tradition I’ve followed elsewhere for years now is The Friday Five. I thought it would be fun to bring it over to my professional space, too—to take a peak at the woman behind the curtain, so to speak. This week’s theme is chess, in honor of Deep Blue’s historic (or is that historical?) victory over Garry Kasparov on this date in 1996.

1. When and how did you learn to play chess?

I think at some point my dad tried to teach me and my brother. He had grown up playing a lot of chess with his brother and I think he wanted us to learn, too, but it never really took for either of us. I think I still have an Usborne Guide to Chess he gave me for Christmas one year somewhere. Since then, I’ve tried a couple times to “really learn how to play this time.” It seems to be a whim that hits me every couple of years, but never really sticks.

When it comes to black-and-white strategy board games, I had a slightly better time with Othello (or Reversi, if you prefer), but only slightly. My mom, maybe among the last people you would ever suspect of being strategic and crafty, habitually destroyed me at it. I’m sure if she had been born in another time and place, she would have been a champion Go player.

 

2. How is your chess game?

As you can probably imagine, not very good.

 

3. When did you last find yourself in a stalemate?

As a rule, I try to avoid conflict and confrontation with people. The closest thing to a stalemate would be, I guess, my critique group stalling out in scheduling an upcoming make-up meeting. Yes, not quite a stalemate, but like I said—the closest I get.

 

4. A gambit is a chess opening in which a player sacrifices a piece in hopes of gaining an advantageous position. What was one of your recent, real-world gambits?

I think one of the problems I have with chess is that I have a tendency to hoard pieces. Even though the mechanics of the game dictate that both players have to lose pieces in order for the board to open up and for play to really begin, I can never feel totally comfortable losing a piece. I think I maintain that attitude in real life as well.

 

5. Which piece on the chessboard is most like you, and why?

I suppose the bishop: I’m narrow in my interests, but within them I’m quite knowledgeable. Or maybe the knight: I eventually get to where I’m going, but my path is a little more roundabout than other people’s.